Musgrave Round-Up

Musgrave Round-Up

The Musgrave round-up is first in a series of reviews I will do about all pencils (that are currently obtainable) in a specific brand.  I often wonder if pencil companies that brand pencils with different names really have differences within each pencil.  Besides aesthetics, do these different pencils have different cores?  To test this out, I will take each pencil and write one full college ruled page and compare how each pencil feels while writing and how well it performs when it comes to erasing, smearing, and darkness.  Before we get to the actual reviews, let’s talk about Musgrave as a company first.

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Musgrave has been making pencils in Shelbyville, Tennessee since 1916.  Supplied by Tennessee red cedar and a system of recycling cedar rail fences for more modern wire, Musgrave had all the resources it needed.  Musgrave not only bartered with farmers for the old cedar, but their crew installed the new wire and pole fencing that would be replacing that cedar.  Since the cedar rails had been outdoors for an extended period of time, they were already weathered and in perfection condition.  The cedar was cut into pencil slats that were sent from Tennessee to German manufacturers like Faber.  In 1919, the Tennessee red cedar had been depleted and a new source needed to found.  Luckily, a wood with similar characteristics from California, California Incense Cedar was shipped it.  This new wood was fast growing, plentiful, and renewable.  Musgrave held on as a company through the Great Depression and during World War II and still operates today in Shelbyville.  One the few pencil manufacturers left in the United States, Musgrave is an example of how ingenuity and dedication to one’s product can last the test of time.

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The pencils I will be talking about today are the ones that are easily available for purchase.  There are other pencils in their lineup that I would have liked to try, but I am still waiting for a response from the company about how I can acquire those.  I will update accordingly if that ever comes through.  All pencils reviewed today were purchased via CW Pencil Enterprise.  Please note that I am not comparing these pencils against each other– that would be unrealistic as these pencils have a variety of purposes.  Instead, I have used each pencil for a period of time and have provided some feedback and thoughts on how each performed.

Bugle ($0.25)

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The Bugle has a very simple design.  It has a round, unpainted barrel with a thin clear overcoat with the word “BUGLE” and 1816 stamped in white.  There are also two little bugles stamped on the pencil which make it completely adorable.  There is no eraser and the pencil is very light in your hand.  Based on the smell test, I do not think this pencil is made of cedar, but I could be mistaken.  Writing with the Bugle produced a very loud scratchy sound, but not a scratchy feel.  I felt it was a bit light for a number 2 pencil and because of this lightness it was very easy to erase.  Point retention is amazing and I was able to fill an entire sheet of college ruled notebook paper before I had to sharpen again.

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I would recommend this pencil for a few reasons.  Aesthetically speaking, this pencil is great.  I really like the bugles stamped into the side and I am a sucker for natural looking pencils.  I personally don’t like round barreled pencils, but that’s just me.  Also, the Bugle has wonderful point retention even though it is a bit lighter than I like for a number 2 pencil.  As a furious note taker, I find myself having to sharpen a lot.  This was not the case with the Bugle as it seemed to just keep going and going.

Harvest #2 ($0.35)

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At first glance, the Harvest is your typical looking yellow school pencil.  Upon further inspection, you can see that it is so much more than that.  I have to admit, I am in love with the design of this pencil.  It has a nice sharp hexagonal barrel (some hate this; I love it) and a thick coat of yellow lacquer.  The typography of the word Harvest is wonderful and the other gold foil stamping has a nice, retro look to it.  The Harvest advertises that it has “bonded lead” which means the core is glued right onto the barrel.  This increases strength and decreases breakage.  The ferrule of this pencil is great as well with a crimson brown stripe in the middle of it.  It holds a bright pink eraser (that performs very meh).  It appears the Harvest is made with white ash as it is much lighter in color than the other pencils in Musgrave’s line-up.

Sadly, the core of my pencil was a bit off-center so it sharpened unevenly, but not so much so that it impacted its performance.  The Harvest wrote as dark as a number two pencil should and had average point retention.  I was able to fill up an entire notebook page, but towards the end I found myself rotating the pencil a lot to get a sharper edge to write with.  Don’t let my off center core dissuade you from picking up this pencil.  It is beautiful!  I would recommend not using the supplied eraser as it is pretty bad and feels as though you might rip your paper while using it.

Test Scoring 100 ($0.40)

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The Test Scoring pencil produces a love/hate sentiment among users.  Some like the sharp hex edge and shiny graphite lay down while other abhor it.  Say what you will, but the Test Scoring pencil looks pretty rad.  I like that there is “100” on the side of it almost encouraging you to do your best.  The graphite composition of the Test Scoring pencil is artificial and is actually called electro-graphite.  The reason this formulation is used is because it puts down a more reflective mark so the grading machines can pick up on it.  It writes nice and dark and has a smooth feel while writing.  Of course because of this darkness, point retention suffers.  This may be fine for grade schoolers, but for post grads taking tests, sometimes pencil sharpening is not allowed so I’d bring a dozen or so pre-sharpened just in case.

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The eraser is shit.  Seriously, it almost ripped my paper,  I wouldn’t dare use this eraser on a Scantron for fear of ripping a hole right through the sheet.  I wouldn’t recommend this pencil for heavy note taking since it dulls pretty quickly and smears a great deal.  I do enjoy the sharp hex it offers, but I can’t see myself ever using this outside of its intended purpose.  This pencil would be perfect for jotting down short notes or lists.

Ceres 909 ($0.40)

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The Ceres is another one of Musgrave’s standard yellow school pencil offerings.  It has the usual stamping of the Musgrave brand and then the word “Ceres” in a font that I know I’ve seen before, but I can’t remember what it’s called.  It has a standard number two pencil kind of darkness and I’d place it somewhere in between the Bugle and the Harvest as far as darkness is concerned.  Writing with the Ceres can be a mixed bag; at times it wrote pretty well with very little feedback, but at other times it was very scratchy.  It was almost as if there were some kind of little chunks of something within the graphite because the scratchiness would go away after writing for a little bit.

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The graphite it does lay down is easily erased, but not by its own eraser.  I mean you could erase it with the built-in eraser, but it is very rough on the paper.  Also, the eraser disintegrates, but does not create any dust and instead kind of tears off in chunks.  I wouldn’t say that this pencil is trash, but if it were in a pencil cup with others I would not reach for it unless I had to.  It certainly is better that the garbage most offices order from Staples or WB Mason, but marginally.  Musgrave really needs to work on their eraser game.

News 600 ($0.40)

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The News 600 is not your standard writing pencil.  You will have frustrating results if you try to use it for note taking– just don’t.  It is super dark and soft; I’d say it would be around a 4B or so and it has a larger than normal core.  Be careful with handling this pencil as pencils with larger cores can break if the pencil is dropped.  Having a broken core inside a pencil will render it pretty much useless since when you sharpen it, the point will simply fall right out of the pencil.  I would only recommend this pencil to be used by artists or if you are doing a newspaper crossword puzzle.

Final Thoughts

Musgrave is one the oldest pencil manufacturers still making pencils in the US.  They offer a pretty large line up of pencils, but their main business seems to be in novelty pencils.  I would say that for the cost of each pencil, you get what you pay for.  If Musgrave made some small improvements like improving their erasers and moving back to using California cedar, they would be a contender for one of my favorite pencil companies.  I love, love, love a sharp hex and Musgrave seems to be the only place that can offer that.  Too bad small, easily remedied things make me not want to carry much of their stuff in my daily rotation.  I mean, I love the Bugle, but it’s a round pencil, so unless I was all out of hexagonals I will not use it.  One final thing for Musgrave: please update your logo.  It’s bad.  Please.

 

Back to School Spring Semester Edition

Back to School Spring Semester Edition

I love college for the simple fact that one can have two “back to schools” a year (more if you want to torture yourself with an intercession course).  Each spring and fall I start fresh and do a bit of gathering for the coming semester.  I clean out the backpack from last semester (sorry black, shriveled banana– forgot you were in there) and reorganize my tools.  I have been thinking a lot about what I will use this spring.  This is the first semester in my college career where I am taking a full course load.  That’s four classes and 16 credits– no small feat for a non-traditional like myself.  In order to stay engaged and motivated, I often mix up what writing tools I use throughout the semester.  Here is a glimpse into my backpack and at each and every thing that I put into that backpack for the semester.

The Bag

Like most college students, I have a lot of shit to carry around.  I had considered purchasing a hip messenger bag, but it was hard to find one that had all of the features I wanted– extra secure pockets, place for water bottle, multiple compartments for various things (headphones, pocket notebooks, pencils/pens, etc.), and comfortable straps since a lot of my classes involve me trekking across one end of campus to the other.  I decided to go with a North Face (I know, SO cliché) backpack.  I chose the Recon because it checked off all of the boxes for me:

I have had this bag for two years now and it has yet to let me down.  It has worn very well and all zippers work like new.  While I would love to have a reason to purchase a new backpack, I have no reason to with the North Face Recon.

Paper

This selection really goes against my uppity, elitist stationery preferences, but my notebook choice for last semester and this semester is the lowly Staples college ruled spiral notebook.  I have found that when I am taking note on the fly in class or when I am reading along with a text I am unable to do so neatly.  I have a strong desire to have everything uniform and routine with my notes (same headers/hierarchy), so using a good notebook for that and having to take my time to achieve this goal would no be feasible.  What I have done instead is if I do take notes for a class that is within my major, I will re-write them in a nicer notebook for long-term use.  Using cheap Staples notebooks allows me to spend a bit more money on things like pencils and other tools where quality does matter.

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Pencil Case

I actually use two pencil cases for my every day carry backpack.  The first one is the Nomadic PE-18 Pen case.  I chose this case for the simple fact that it had a lot of compartments without being too bulky.  I really like that it has one large compartment for pens and pencils and a smaller compartment for a few highlighters or pens as well.  Every compartment is smartly designed and the Nomadic has held up for the past three years of every day use.

The second pencil case I use is one I just purchased.  It is the CW Pencil Enterprise branded Viking leather pencil case.  This case is beautiful and even holds an unsharpened Blackwing.  I plan on using this case as a holder for whichever pencil and eraser I am using for the week as well as highlighters and any marking pencils I need for work.  Caroline is currently sold out of these cases, but she plans on getting more in stock in a variety of colors.

Erasers

There are really only two erasers I ever use: the Matomaru-Kun Plastic Eraser and the Tombow MONO “Erase Easily” Eraser.  The Matomaru-Kun is a bit softer than the Tombow, but both perform well.  They do not damage the paper at all and completely erase pencil markings opposed to smearing them around a bit before rubbing them off the paper.

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Sharpeners

I carry four sharpeners with me in a small plastic box and each sharpener has a particular use.  The Masterpiece and/or the Pollux are for when I have time to sharpen a nice long point on a pencil.  The Milan square sharpener is for when I am taking notes in class and need to sharpen quickly.  The Milan leaves a “just right” point for writing.  Finally, I use an M+R  Brass dual hole sharpener for when I need to sharpen a jumbo pencil or one of my highlighter pencils.

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Highlighters

I have a thing for highlighters.  I can never seem to settle on a particular brand or color for too long.  I used to use the Tombow Kei Coat Double Sided highlighters, but now have moved on to the Zebra Mildliners.  I have all three sets, but really like the light neon ones for schoolwork.  I also use the Caran D’Ache  Couleurs Flous Jumbo highlighter pencils when I am in the mood.  I recommend all colors but the yellow one as the yellow really needs you to push pretty hard for it to show up noticeably.

Pencils

This is a tough one.  I have hundreds of pencils around the house.  To select just a few to accompany me on my school adventures is a difficult task and at first I was just going to pick one brand and stick with it for the whole semester.  Then I got thinking.  Part of the fun is using a different pencil every now and then.  I narrowed it down to a select few:

I will not go into how each pencil performs as I will probably blog about it this semester, but I will say that I tried to pick a range of brands while staying within the same lead grade in order to have some consistency.  I made sure to try to include pencils that I have never used before to keep it interesting.

Planner

In previous years, I have used a Field Notes undated planner for school assignments.  This year I decided to go with a Baron Fig Confidant planner since I have never tried any of their paper or products that much.  I can say that initially I am underwhelmed with the Baron Fig planner– the cover fabric seems to have come unglued from the heavy cover underneath.  This is only along the spine and does not affect the use of the book, but I guess I was expecting more.  We shall see how it turns out.

I hope all of you enjoyed a glimpse into my academic school supply life.  I’d be curious to hear from other students to see what they choose to carry.  Leave a comment if so inspired.

 

 

 

Birthdays, Spirits, Erasable Notebooks, and Moleskines

Birthdays, Spirits, Erasable Notebooks, and Moleskines

General Pencil Company Turns 127

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Source: parade.com

General Pencil Company has been creating pencils since 1889 and is located in my home state of New Jersey.  Not only is it a great feat to have an American-run business last for 127 years, but the fact that a wooden pencil company has lasted that long is incredible.  I enjoy General’s products and have reviewed them in the past.  While General pencils are not Tombow MONOs, they are great for what they cost.  I’d recommend trying the Pacific, Cedar Pointe, and the Supreme.

shin sharpens your spirit

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Source: designboom

Um, OK.  I am always a fan of sometimes overly priced pretentious bullshit, but this sharpener makes some intense claims.  From the description:

The Shin sharpener is a whetstone-style pencil sharpener that turns the ordinary task of sharpening your pencil into a meditative practice. The repetitive task of sharpening the edge of your pencil is supposed to support concentration, inspiration and inner peace…

While I have to admit that there is something zen-like about getting a point to perfection, my spirit has never been sharpened by the act.  At $165, I’d much rather put it towards and el Casco or a handful of Polluxes.  The sharpener itself is a great conversation piece, but to me it looks like they repurposed a stick incense holder and shoe-horned a sharpener into it.  I shouldn’t be surprised that this product is listed on a site that sells a $320 brass fertilizing syringe for gardening.

Everlast Notebook

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Source: Kickstarter

The Everlast Notebook is the antithesis to everything I look for in a notebook– you cannot use pencil and it is made to be a digital product wrapped in a loose shell of an analog format.  The concept of having one notebook may be appealing to millennials (the Kickstarter for this thing is almost at a million dollars!), but I like my notebooks to be permanent.  There is something to be said for a stack of well-used notebooks that I can flip through and see what pen or pencil I have used.  Writing in a traditional notebook is such a tactile experience, I’d be horrified to erase my scribblings after I have essentially taken a picture of what I spent time on writing.  I think one positive of this product is how it can automatically catalog what you have written by ticking off a symbol on the bottom of each page.  While I am first an analog junkie, being organized comes in a close second.  Because one of my New Year’s resolutions is to unplug, I’ll have to pass on this one, but it’s a cool concept anyway.

Moleskine Has a Banner Year

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Source: Dustin Wax

Even though this new story is written on Yahoo Sports! (I have NO IDEA why; perhaps notebook writing could be a sport), it is nice to see some coverage about analog writing in mainstream news sites.  Even though I feel like the analog movement is still a niche group, I welcome any boost to my most loved hobby and passion.  I wish other, more quality, notebooks got some coverage (Write Notepads, Field Notes, Baron Fig) since I have noticed the overall quality of Moleskine notebooks to be declining since I first started using them years ago.  I am sure that this is a product of a need to cut costs and increase profits, but I think for the market they want to attract they miss the mark.  For the same price I could purchase something that is locally produced with better quality.  For a niche hobby like stationery and notebook using, Moleskine’s approach falls short.  I do realize that an uninitiated individual has no clue as to what else is out there, but I suppose that is why the universe that surrounds our hobby is so small.

Eraser Round Up

Eraser Round Up

This week has been a bit different.  A lot of times, people always ask me what the best eraser is for everyday use.  I usually answer “Mitsubishi Boxy”, but after the nth time of recommending that glorious little black rectangular eraser I began to wonder.  What about the other ones?  Just like pencils, there are dozens of different types of erasers made of different materials that appeal to and equal amount of individuals.  I did not want to merely review erasers– reviewing items is a subjective matter and what I may like may be completely horrible to someone else.  What follows are twelve different impressions on erasers– some quite common and well known and some you may not have heard of.  Note: A Blackwing 602 was used on a Field Notes Shenandoah with 60# paper.

Papermate Pink Pearl

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The Pink Pearl is perhaps the most well known eraser on this list.  I am sure all of us have fond memories of using this rubbery pink parallelogram during math classes.  We also probably remember how gritty it was and how it left horrible tears or pink smudges on the paper.  Well, this is not your 80’s Pink Pearl.  I will readily admit that I expected that Pink Pearl of yesteryear; gritty, barely usable, and endlessly frustrating.  Papermate has a tendency to take good products and butcher them and the Pink Pearl– I figured– was no exception.  Boy was I surprised when I used the Pink Pearl for the first time in 25 years.  No grit, no smear; just buttery smooth effectiveness.  The Pink Pearl performed well beyond my expectations and has become my new favorite EDC eraser.  There is something about the nostalgia of carrying a Pink Pearl with me everywhere.  I like it.

Seed Radar  

Radar

The Radar came recommended from one of my favorite Erasables, Less (check out their page!).  It comes in a variety of subtle colors, but I gravitated towards blue.  I am kinda bummed the eraser itself is not quite blue enough, but where it lacks in vibrancy, it make up in performance.  Not only does this plastic eraser remove most traces of graphite, but its dust rolls up nicely into little bunches for easy clean up.  The Radar has a useful cardboard sheath that prevents the eraser from breaking.

Tombow MONO

Mono

I am a huge fan of Tombow products.  I have a current affair with their Brush Pens and the MONO 100 was my favorite pencil before I found the Erasable Podcast group.  I expect nothing but the best from Tombow and while the eraser does a good job with line drawing and regular handwriting, it struggled with the shading portion of the test.  At first, it smeared a bit and then managed to get the job done.  Like most plastic erasers, the dust clumps neatly together and does not leave a mess.  The MONO is affordable and worth giving a shot.

Caran D’Ache Technik

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I expected a lot from the Technik for two reasons: its price and the fact that it is made by Caran D’Ache.  I was most let down by the eraser’s ability to erase cleanly.  It performed OK with line drawings, but with the shading it had excessive smearing and took a lot of effort to get the most graphite cleared.  The Technik is a very hard eraser and it leaves neat rolls of eraser dust.  I posit that the hardness of the plastic has to do with its crummy erasing performance.  I know I said I wouldn’t review erasers here, but I can’t resist with this one.  I’d pass on purchasing and instead get 3 Pink Pearls (or really 3 of anything).

Pentel Ain

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The Pentel Ain erases well, but is a bit dusty.  It showed some smearing on the shading part of the erasing test, but with some effort it came through and got the job done.  Not much to say here, because it was solidly mediocre.

Koh-I-Noor Magic

Magic

The Magic is an eraser that I have been wanting to get my hands on for some time.  I love how each eraser is different with varying colors and swirls.  As a rubber eraser, the Magic is clearly very dusty.  I’d liken the dustiness to a standard pink pencil eraser (think Ticonderoga/General’s).  It has a nice pungent rubbery smell and does fantastically on regular light handwriting and lines.  It is a smeary mess on the darker lines and shading parts and actually reminds me of the Pink Pearl from years ago.  The Magic is a cool eraser nonetheless and is a nice pocket carry, but at $2.50 you are definitely paying for the novelty.

Staedtler Mars Plastic

Mars

I was quite unimpressed by the Mars plastic; it was dusty, took a lot of effort to erase things, and smeared a heck of a lot.  I expected more from Staedtler, but was left with a less than average eraser.  I do like the size of the Mars as it makes for easy erasing, but the effort you put forth getting the job done negates the bonus of a larger eraser.

Hinodewashi Matomaru-kun

Hino

The Hinodewashi came highly recommended from pretty much anyone that has used it, so I was excited to use this delightfully bright white block of plastic.  It performed beautifully with very little effort.  The dust rolled up nicely and did not smear any of what was erased.  These are hard to come by in the US, but Caroline has a few at CW Pencil Enterprise if you are interested.

Craft Design Technology No. 14

CDT

The minimalist design of CDT products always draw me in.  I enjoy a product that lets its product do all the talking and not the packaging.  Well, the CDT left a lot to be desired.  First, when opening the eraser I could not help but notice the smell.  I can’t even tell you what it smelled like, but it was a chemical-like smell with a hint of plastic.  In fact, it was so pungent I could smell it without putting it up to my nose.  Once I got past the smell, the CDT was meh.  Yes, it erases, but is dustier than I had expected and it took a lot of effort to erase the samples and even then, you can see a shadow of what was once there.

Koh-I-Noor Thermoplastic

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I want to start off by saying this eraser was my absolute favorite design wise.  I love the hexagonal shape (which I believe is a nod to the pencil) and the recessed center that allows for a very comfortable grip.  The six corners allow for maximum control and precision.  The Thermoplastic erases OK, but does leave a shadow on both samples.  I would say that this eraser is best for light writers out there that do not press that hard or use H grade graphite.  I know this eraser says its plastic, but it was the dustiest of the plastic erasers I have tested.  The Thermoplastic comes in a myriad of colors and if not used as an every day eraser, its still a cool pocket carry (its almost reminiscent of those worry stones one would carry in their pocket).

Faber-Castell Dust Free Art Eraser

FaberCastell

Another recommendation from Less, the FC Dust Free never ceased to amaze me as I explored its qualities.  First, I love the dark green color– it does a good job of hiding any graphite marks that may transfer to the eraser.  Second, while subtle, is the contoured edges that make for comfortable holding.  I really didn’t think that this would make a difference, but it did and has a really good hand feel when erasing bigger projects.  Finally, it lives up to its name: Dust Free.  This eraser was perhaps the most effective when keeping its waste materials rolled up in tiny little bunches.  The FC Dust Free also erases beautifully.  Not the top performer in the “clean erase” field, but it definitely holds its own.

Sakura Foam

Sakura

The Sakura Foam is one of the few erasers on this list that I have used before.  I really like the way its shavings ball up together– this makes for a quick and easy cleanup.  The Sakura does an amazing job erasing any kind of line drawing or handwriting.  Where its lacks is its ability to erase large areas of shading.  I’m not an artist, so this is not a deal breaker for me, but something to keep in mind.  Another downfall of this eraser is that it wears down pretty quickly.  That worn down edge you see in the picture is just from the two tests I did (line drawing, sentence erasing, and shading).  The Sakura definitely lives up to its “High Quality” designation, but if you make a lot of mistakes, you will blow through these pretty quickly.  With that being said, it continues to be one of my favorites for every day erasing.

 

 

 

Mitsubishi 9000 HB

Mitsubishi 9000 HB

I must say, with full disclosure, that Japanese-made pencils will always have a special spot in my pencil loving heart.  It was the Tombow MONO that first piqued my interest and sent me down the rabbit hole of pencil using/collecting.  There is something about Japanese pencils; the darkness and strength of their graphite, the beautiful finish and attention to detail that goes into each brand, and the overall consistency I am met with each time I pick up a new pencil to use.  This week, I used the Mitsubishi 9000 HB and fell in love with its smooth lay-down and beautiful color scheme.  First, the pencil itself is a sight to behold.  It has a shiny green lacquer with a darker Kelly green stripe around the top where the lead grade is located.  The gold foil stamping is precise and really shines with the green color.  One one side (and perhaps one of my favorite imprints to date) it has “Made by elaborate process” stamped proudly and reassuringly.  And see, that’s just it.  I really feel as though so much went into the making of this pencil and that careful scrutiny accompanied it during its entire journey into my possession.

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Sharpening the Mitsubishi 9000 was a joy and not once did a point prematurely break.  AS with all of my pencils, the first sharpen is made by the Classroom Friendly and then I switch over to the KUM Masterpiece (which is now on US soil…see Caroline!).  My entire week of writing with this pencil was a joy.  With a heavy note-taking week behind me, I still have about half a pencil left.  It erases effortlessly with the Mitsubishi Boxy and  does not smudge or smear.

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This pencil will definitely make it into my rotation and I recommend that everyone should try one at least once.  They are moderately priced at $1.00 a pencil, but with its durable graphite, I feel as though this pencil will last you twice as long.  If you are interested, as always, head to Caroline.  Overall 9.5/10

 

 

 

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Product Review: Classroom Friendly Sharpener

Product Review: Classroom Friendly Sharpener

Now that school is out for the month, I find that I am using pencils a bit less and have more time to focus on some other aspects of the hardcore pencil-using community.  I often talk about how pencils I use are sharpened (mostly via handheld sharpeners) and how the nature of my sharpening has me going through many new blades since I use a fresh pencil every week.  This is where the Classroom Friendly Sharpener comes in.  I have found that pre-sharpening my pencils before heading off to class really helps me to cut down on the initial wear and tear a handheld blade experiences when dealing with a new pencil.  At first glance, the Classroom Friendly looks like an ordinary pencil sharpener you would find mounted in the classroom.  That is where the similarities to the old school sharpeners end.

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The sharpeners come in six different colors and are priced at $24.99, but bulk discounts are offered.  The Classroom Friendly offers an automatic stop, so you will not eat your pencils needlessly.  The shavings drop down into the removable receptacle below and it is easy to clean and maintain.  The sharpener comes with a mount for a table or desk, but you can also use the sharpener without the mount as you do not need to hold onto the pencil as it is being sharpened.  There are three sets of “teeth” that grip the pencil when inserted into the sharpener and while this does a good job of holding the pencil tight, it leaves some pretty significant gouges in the pencil being sharpened.  This is not an issue at all for classroom use, but for pencil collectors and enthusiasts, it is something you should know.  Some rubber grips might be a better idea if Classroom Friendly decides on a re-design.

As far as sharpening is concerned, the Classroom Friendly is amazing.  Not only does it sharpen well, but it is super quiet which is a bonus for teachers.  I jokingly mounted the sharpener to my nightstand for a bit and sharpened a pencil while my wife was sleeping next to me and she did not move at all.  This thing is REALLY quiet.  I also enjoy the nice, long point it provides and it is comparable to everyone’s favorite Long Point sharpener by KUM.  The Classroom Friendly sharpens evenly and accurately every time and I have not had an instance yet where I have received sub-par results (I have sharpened about 30 or so pencils with this thing so far).

With its sturdy metal construction, quiet operation, and intuitive nature, the Classroom Friendly Sharpener is a no-brainer for teachers everywhere.  I also can recommend it to pencil enthusiasts as the Classroom Friendly does its job well and there is a way around the gouges it produces in your pencils.  Just wrap a post-it around the barrel of your pencil before you sharpen and you will not have any problems.  If you do not already own a Classroom Friendly, you should pick one up.  It is well worth the cost. Head here if you are interested!

*I was provided a Classroom Friendly Sharpener free of charge for a review, but my review was not influenced by Classroom Friendly or any other entity than myself.*

 

Calepino No. 2

Calepino No. 2

The Matte Black Calepino No. 2 pencil is a real gem.  Made in France, the Calepino (which comes from the French word calepin meaning notebook) is simple, yet elegant.  The pencil has a classic look and “Fabriqué en France” is stamped in a simple script on the barrel.  The ferrule is a lustrous gold and it encases a white eraser.  The Calepino pencil is made of Pulay wood  and sharpens beautifully.

Writing with the Calepino was a pleasure as it laid down nice, smooth lines and did not smudge.  It’s graphite was strong and was not subject to any breakage this past week.  The eraser that comes on the pencil is effective, but wears away pretty quickly so have a separate eraser on hand for bigger mistakes.  At around two dollars a pencil, these do not come cheap to the everyday pencil user, but well worth every penny.  What is interesting to note is that Calepino is primarily a notebook manufacturer, but they hit it out of the park with their pencil design and function here.

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Overall: 9/10

*If you would like to try out the Calepino, head over to Caroline!  She sells singles and is pretty awesome!*